Blog

The Importance of Training

Training has been a subject of multiple articles on the Lug-All blog. We’ve covered a handful of different types of training, including emergency training, safety training, and equipment training. Why do we focus on the topic of training so often? Training is vitally important for completing any job safely and...

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Trade Shows: A Quick Look

Every year, producers, manufacturers, and other businesses attend industry trade shows. These trade shows provide a platform for businesses to demonstrate new technologies and products and for potential customers and users to view them firsthand. Many businesses also announce new initiatives and officially launch product lines at trade shows. In...

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Promise to Perform Industries, Inc. Announces Acquisition of Transol Corporation and Their Subsidiaries, Including Lug-All Corporation

As of October 29, 2021, Spanco, Rigid Lifelines, and Lug-All are under the ownership of Promise to Perform Industries, Inc. All of Transol Corporation’s subsidiaries, including Spanco, Inc., Rigid Lifelines, and Lug-All Corporation and their assets have been acquired through a management buyout to ensure maximum continuity to customers, employees,...

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Lug-All U-Frame Pawl Replacement

Like many of the components on a Lug-All come along ratchet winch hoist, the U-frame pawl can be replaced if it becomes worn out or damaged. The U-frame pawl is responsible for turning the drum by engaging with the teeth as the handle travels its arch. It is a crucial...

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Lug-All Pawl Stop Replacement

The Main Frame Pawl stop is a small but crucial part of every Lug-All come along ratchet winch hoist. The pawl stop anchors the main frame spring, which causes the pawl to engage the drum, allowing the hoist to function. However, the pawl stop can become damaged from impact or...

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Lug-All—Made in America

Lug-All was founded by George Uhlig in 1949, and manufacturing began on the Lug-All winch hoist, the first product to function as both a winch and a hoist. From the beginning, Lug-All has been made in America. Today, Lug-All is headquartered in Birdsboro, Pennsylvania, and every new Lug-All winch hoist...

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Lug-All Pre-Operational Inspection

Lug-All Come Along Ratchet Winch Hoists have always been designed and produced to high standards. High-quality materials and precision construction ensure that Lug-All winch hoists deliver consistent performance for many years. To protect the longevity of your Lug-All, it is important to perform routine inspections and maintenance. Inspection Checklist Before...

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Offensive Safety Measures

Like many companies, we at Lug-All like to tout the safety features of our Wire Rope and Web Strap Come Along Ratchet Winch Hoists. Our winch hoists are designed to improve safety for our users, and in industries like utility work, safe tools and equipment are crucial to worker safety....

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How to Choose a Lug-All Winch Hoist

Lug-All offers a wide range of come along ratchet winch hoist models. Different models are designed for different purposes; some are better suited for commercial uses, while others are designed for consumer applications. How do you decide which model or which features you need? Read More

Why Did My Lug-All Handle Break?

If you are wondering why the handle on your Lug-All come along ratchet winch hoist bent or seemed to break, you’re not alone. Users who don’t know all of the exact design elements of Lug-All winch hoists are sometimes confused when their handle seems to fail. You might think that...

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Benefits of Customizing Lug-All Hoists for Utility Applications

Linemen and utility workers make up a large portion of Lug-All users. Many electrical utility applications require equipment with similar features and capabilities, but no two applications are identical. To make Lug-All come along ratchet winch hoists as useful and effective as possible, we offer a large selection of customizable...

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Electrical Linemen Emergency Response Training

Electrical line workers are required by OSHA to receive certain types of safety training. There is a good reason for that requirement, since electrical line work can be among the most dangerous professions. Heights, heavy equipment, and electricity all pose potential risks to workers who build and maintain electrical power...

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